PERIODIZATION
Feb. 01.

Fundamentals of Training: Periodization

Fundamentals of Training: Periodization

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Not all of us are trying to become power lifters but all of us can benefit from an increase in strength. Whether you are an intermediate gym goer, a mother, an athlete or a 70 year old woman the benefits of muscular strength help with every day activities.

How does someone gain strength? Strength is gained by stressors put on the body and adaptations occurs.  Like a baby adapts to the new stress load of their body weight, it does not take long for adaptation to occur and the child start running around the house. The same occurs in a grown individual’s body when lifting weights at the gym. It is quite a bit more advanced than simply adding more and more weight;  that is where periodization training can help you get to the next level.

Periodization is a system of training where training is broken into periods of time, each period has is a specific goal set for strength, power or hypertrophy gains.  When adding stress to the neuromuscular system there are phases the muscle goes through. First the neuromuscular system has an alarm response where energy out put is high as the body recognizes it is being challenged, then there is resistance where the body is adapting to the stimulus and lastly the exhaustion phase where energy is depleted and no adaptation occurs. There are two forms of periodization training linear and non linear. Using these methods of training help avoid the exhaustion phase and use all valuable energy in the adaptation phase until a peak performance or competition.

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Linear is where training is broken down into weeks or months (mesocycle) where each period has a specific goal and rep range. This is best for the beginner lifter where training phases are broken down into 4-6 weeks. It is easier to track and can allow slower progressions to avoid injury.

Nonlinear periodization training is for the more advanced lifter and is a daily change in either volume or intensity (intensity=%1RM, Volume=sets x reps.) The most commonly known of this form of training is DUP or daily undulated periodization training because daily the adaptation mechanism is changed.

Which is better?

There is no evidence that one program works better than the other.  Different athletes should consider which program is most beneficial based on when and how often they need to perform optimally.

 

Challenge your abilities!

 

Hoffman, Jay R. “Periodized Training for the Strength/ Power Athlete.” NSCA’s Performance Training Journal 1.9 (n.d.): 8-11. Web. 30 Jan. 2015.

Wathen, Dan, Thomas R. Baechle, and Roger W. Earle. “Periodization.” Famu.edu. N.p., 26 Oct. 2011. Web. 29 Jan. 2015

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